World History For Us All Logo Teaching
Units
Curriculum
at a Glance
Foundations
of this Curriculum
Questions and
Themes
Glossary Teachers'
Comments
Evaluate
This Site
Links
Contact
Us
World History For Us All Spacer Image
History, Geography, and Time Big Eras 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Past and Future
Home >

Big Era Eight: Landscape Unit 8.5

menu
menu Complete Teaching Unit in PDF format

The Causes and Consequences of World War II
1939 – 1945 CE

Why This Unit?

This landscape unit gives students the opportunity to debate the causes of the global conflict using historians’ rather than politicians’ tools. Students will practice analyzing primary sources, mostly photographs, posters, and speeches. Moreover, students will analyze secondary source data on national military preparedness and a timeline of the creation and use of military technology during World War II. Finally, students will debate the consequences of aerial attacks on civilian populations during World War II.

Unit Objectives

Upon completing this unit, students will be able to:

1. Analyze statistical data and speeches to compare military expenditures and role of nationalism as causes of the Second World War.

2. Analyze textbook presentations of starting and ending dates for the Second World War to discuss periodization of the first half of the twentieth century.

3. Compare propaganda posters used by combatant countries during the war to identify similar techniques used to demonize enemies.

 

Time and Materials

This unit can be completed in five class periods.

The only materials required in this unit are index cards, poster board, and pencils.

Table of Contents

Why this unit?

  2

Unit objectives

  2

Time and materials

  3

Author

  3

The historical context

  3

This unit in the Big Era time line

  5

Lesson 1: Who was Prepared for War?

  6

Lesson 2: Periodization Debate: When did World War II Begin and End?

13

Lesson 3: War Propaganda: Messages and Media used to Promote Nationalism

15

Lesson 4: Military Technology

25

Lesson 5: Turning Point in Global Warfare Debate: Attacks on Civilians

30

Assessment

33

This unit and the Three Essential Questions

34

This unit and the Seven Key Themes

34

This unit and the Standards in Historical Thinking

35

Resources

35

Correlations to National and State Standards

36

Conceptual links to other lessons

37


Complete Teaching Unit in PDF Format
 

 

(Note: documents in Portable Document Format (PDF) require Adobe Acrobat Reader 5.0 or higher to view, download Adobe Acrobat Reader.)